CELEBRATE THE DEAD, MEXICAN WAY

Yes, that is the Mexican way. Mexico has a unique personality, different from the rest of the world. Mexico’s culture is rich, colorful and vibrant. The traditions and customs of the Mexican people are varied and diverse. Music, dance, especially folk dancing is very common. The Mexican cuisine is well known all over the world. Mexico has many lively festivals and celebrations, let’s talk about some of them.

Día de los Muertos:

Also known as  “the day of the dead”, is celebrated from on 1st and 2nd November. It is a public holiday in Mexico where all families honor the dead by bringing flowers, old pictures, sugar skulls and favorite foods to their graves. It is seen as a way of connecting them to their ancestors. In southern Mexico, it is meant to guide the departed spirits of their loved ones.

Quinceañera:

Spanish for “15 years (feminine form)”, is a traditional celebration in Mexico that celebrates the transition of a girl from her childhood, into womanhood . It marks the maturity of a girl and that she is ready to take on social and family responsibilities. It involves fiestas, lively music, traditional singing, dancing, music and food. An interesting part of the event is the girl breaking “15 piñatas, one for each year of her life. It is celebrated on a grand scale involving all family members and close friends.

Piñata:

It is a figure, usually made in the shape of an animal, using clay and covered with paper maché. and filled with toys and candies, often decorated with bright colored confetti. Although, it originated from China, it has become a custom in Mexico. It is often used at birthday parties and other celebrations, the piñata is hanged from a rope and a child breaks it by hitting repeatedly, all the candies fall. A piñata holds a central value to their childhood.

Mariachi:

Mariachi is a musical group, central to Mexican culture. It usually includes using violin, trumpet and a Spanish guitar. The music of the mariachi is a cultural emblem and an identity for Mexicans. It is played at births, baptisms, quinceañeras, weddings, and even deaths. Most of the songs are about love, betrayal, death, politics, revolutionary heroes, animals and country life. If you see a group of musicians wearing silver studded charro suits and wide brimmed hats, pay attention, you are about to witness the soul of Mexican culture.

By,

Muhammad Fawad